How do you measure educational success?

Posted: August 27, 2010 in Commentary
Tags: , , , ,

The debate on proposed regulation of for-profit colleges [“How to discourage college students,” editorial, Aug. 22] missed the larger point: As a nation we are failing to connect the dots between college and careers. Our research shows that college is increasingly the only path to middle-class earning power. Students need user-friendly information about the costs of postsecondary education and the potential earnings in their chosen career if they are to successfully become part of tomorrow’s workforce.

We need to do a better job of connecting the dots between the costs and returns of postsecondary education. In truth, the basic data already exist in the form of wage records, transcript and program data, figures on job openings and detailed information on occupational competencies. Properly assembled, such an information system would minimize, though not eliminate, the future need for aggressive federal oversight or state-level regulation, a matter at the heart of the current debate. Rather than get sidetracked by discord, our common goal should be to compile this information effectively and make it publicly available.

Anthony P. Carnevale, Washington

The writer is director of the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University.

So maybe we should rate for-profit colleges on whether their graduates can turn a profit and measure their “profitability” by the default rate on their students’ loans? This makes at least as much sense as some of the yearly high-stakes, minimum-standards testing that drives (down) much of the curriculum in many K-12 public schools. If we implement this standard, let’s make sure the for-profit colleges don’t meet the standards by reducing the percentage of poor students admitted.

Have the goal be 100 percent on-time loan repayment by 2014 for all economic categories — poor, lower-middle-income, middle-income, high-income — and 100 percent repayment for separate sub-categories: special education students, English-language-learners, fine arts majors, etc. Or is such an approach “good” for public schools but somehow not so good for for-profit corporations?

//







// <![CDATA[
if ( show_doubleclick_ad && ( adTemplate & INLINE_ARTICLE_AD ) == INLINE_ARTICLE_AD && inlineAdGraf )
{
document.write('

‘) ;
}
// ]]>

Joyce Migdall, Falls Church

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s